This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
This is default featured slide 5 title
 

Monthly Archives: January 2017

7 Low Cost Business Ideas

Starting a business is quite the financial undertaking. There is a lot to consider, and lack of money can sometimes be a deterrent for would-be entrepreneurs. For those who are dreaming big but are on a small budget, here are a few low-cost businesses to inspire that entrepreneurial passion.

Social media and the 24-hour news cycle have created the perfect storm of opportunity for creative professionals like writers and graphic designers, who can use their talents to create high-quality, shareable content for businesses and media outlets. Thanks to a growing part-time economy of freelance and contract workers, it’s easier than ever to market yourself as a professional freelancer.

If you’re a highly organized, detail-oriented individual who loves putting parties together, you might have the right personality to launch an event-planning business. Working for weddings, birthday parties and class reunions, event planners make it easy for others to host an exciting party. LinkedIn, cold calling and planning a few pro-bono events will help give you the proper experience. This will also help you build up a solid database of vendors and contacts so you can help your clients orchestrate the event of their dreams.

Parents are busy with job responsibilities and driving their children from one activity to the next. So most working parents have very little time left to take care of personal errands like grocery shopping, making returns at the mall or mailing packages. The right, driven individual can take care of these time-consuming errands for clients and free up their days for the important things in life. Account for travel expenses when determining your rates, which can be hourly or by the task.

For the musically gifted, offering lessons to others who want to learn an instrument can be a great source of extra income. Unless you’re teaching piano, students can likely bring their own instruments to your home for hour-long lessons. Stock up on sheet music or songbooks in varying genres and aimed at various skill levels so you can offer a wide selection for your potential clients. Voice lessons can also bring in a lot of money if you market yourself to local high school and community theater groups.

Larger firms can hire an agency or full-time staff member to run their Facebook and Twitter accounts and blogs, but small businesses often have to take care of their own social media marketing. With so many other responsibilities, business owners may be too busy or overwhelmed to spend time coming up with a great social media strategy. As a consultant, you can help them determine the best tactics, posting schedules and content for their target audience. As their follower counts grow, so will your business.

Etsy is a popular online marketplace that hosts thousands of at-home retailers and larger productions, like the highly-rated Wildflower + co., selling jewelry, patches and DIY merchandise. Starting an Etsy shop is incredibly affordable. It’s free to join the site and start a shop, though business owners should be aware there are three selling fees: the listing, transaction and payment-processing fees.

What are you passionate about? Yoga? Baking? Web design? If you know something inside and out, you can help others enrich their lives by offering virtual classes. Create downloadable instructional packets and videos, or schedule real-time Skype lessons with clients. Another option for aspiring educators is to start a virtual or home-based tutoring service.

6 Business Ideas for Artists

Art dealer

Imagine making a living finding beautiful works of art and selling them to art enthusiasts. If you have the money to rent space in a high-traffic area, you can open your own art gallery and assist fellow artists get their work noticed. As with any business, building your reputation and niche can be an uphill battle: You’ll need expert networking and marketing skills to get the word out. Use social media to your advantage to show your work and meet people in the business to build your contacts. Once you establish a good client base, you’ll be rubbing elbows with some of your city’s most prominent artists at your gallery parties and exhibits.

Art teacher

Were you an award-winning artist your tenure as a student? Maybe you were a successful TA in college. Or maybe you create amazing works of art through painting, sculpting and other mediums. Teach classes and impart your wisdom to aspiring artists or novices who just want to learn. This idea is best suited to a part-time business, but you can still make good money offering hour-long classes at local craft stores, community centers or your home. Make sure you have a user-friendly website to display your work and entice potential students.

Custom airbrushing

Whether you work on cars, murals or clothing, there’s a wide range of possibilities for an airbrushing artist. You’ll need to purchase some equipment to get started, like an air compressor, stencil materials, and of course, paints and airbrushes. Airbrushing can be done in a well-ventilated storefront, kiosk or even at home in your garage on a freelance or project basis. You can also create and sell airbrushed paintings online or at local events.

Caricature artist

No festival or county fair would be complete without a caricaturist to draw fun, unique souvenirs for visitors to take home. With online tutorials like Learn-To-Draw.com, you can learn caricature techniques and begin building a portfolio to display for potential customers. Then check your town or county’s website for local events that have booths available to rent. You can charge by the portrait at these types of events—depending on how quickly you can draw, the earning potential is huge. There are also opportunities to do your work at weddings, Project Graduation parties, fundraisers and a number of community activities. Once you earn a reputation, you can offer a flat rate to be hired.

Tattoo artist

Some artists use paper as their canvas. Why not use the human body as yours? Working in a tattoo studio can be a lucrative career path for talented artists, but it will require some time and education. Wikihow notes that you need to be state certified by completing an apprenticeship with an experienced tattoo artist and taking tattooing courses. Once you’re certified, referrals from satisfied customers will be your biggest source of business.

Graphic designer

Graphic design runs the gamut, and you can especially succeed as a small business or a freelancer. According to the American Institute of Graphic Arts, graphic artists create images for posters, advertisements, packages, and other printed matter, as well as information visualizations; graphics for newspapers and magazines. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, about one-third of graphic designers are self-employed, so you can work from home on eye-catching visual projects for brands and individuals. AIGA also provides information on how to land your first design job.

7 Holiday Business Ideas

Music/caroling coordination

The holiday season means music is constantly in the air. Whether its events with live music or neighborhood caroling trips, organizing and scheduling that kind of musical manpower is a tall order. A business that helps plan and schedule caroling trips, or one that maintains a team of musicians specifically available for hire for holiday parties could be a useful — and profitable — venture for celebrations everywhere.

Baked goods

Pies, cookies, fruitcakes and gingerbread are all staples of the holiday season. If your kitchen is constantly filled with the smell of freshly baked desserts during the holidays, why not get paid for it by packaging and selling them? People love giving and receiving candies and baked goods during the holidays, so you’re sure to have a huge demand.

Santa Claus appearances

Taking children to the mall to see Santa may be free, but parents will pay big bucks for a home visit from Kris Kringle (or perhaps Mrs. Claus, if you’re a woman). If you don’t mind sacrificing a bit of time on Christmas Eve — or buying/renting a Santa suit — you could make arrangements to drop by the homes of friends and neighbors with young children and personally deliver a few gifts. Want to take this business past the holiday season? Try being the Easter Bunny or Tooth Fairy.

Personal shopper

Many people stress over what to buy their friends and family members for the holidays. As a personal gift shopper, you could help your clients find the perfect gifts at the best prices. Meet with them to discuss their budget and gift recipients, and then research gifts at various price points for the individuals on their list. You can offer pickup and delivery of in-store purchases for an additional charge.

Knitted winter items

Knitting might seem like an activity reserved for grandmothers, but handmade scarves, hats and sweaters are popular during the holidays. Wholesale yarn is relatively inexpensive, and depending on how quickly you can knit, you’ll be able to build up your inventory and spend more time marketing your store. Don’t know how to knit or crochet? Sites like KnittingHelp.com are readily available to teach you.

Gift baskets

Themed baskets are a popular gift choice for the holidays, but many ready-made baskets from retailers are expensive, and people don’t often have the time to purchase individual items and create their own baskets. If you have some great ideas for a basket — cooking products, desserts, movies, bath products, etc. — you can make and sell them as holiday gifts. Arrange items in a decorative basket, wrap it in plastic and put a festive holiday bow on it.

Holiday-card design

If you’re good with Photoshop, you can design and print beautiful, personalized holiday cards for families to send out this year. Offering to create other customized stationery items — such as event invitations, thank-you cards and envelopes.

5 Business Ideas for Fashion Fanatics

Only a select few will ever make it to the runway, but plenty of fashionable startup opportunities await. They all take hard work and a great eye for fashion, but most have very small startup budgets. Here are five startup ideas for the entrepreneurial fashionista.

Putting on a fashion show is no easy feat. Fashion event producers works with designers and models to help put together a show, and may even help coach runway models.

“You would help the designer with runway show casting and have an understanding of how clothes should be portrayed on the body and how the models should carry themselves,” said Kerry Bannigan, founder of Nolcha, a New York-based fashion event production company.

While startup costs are minimal – you won’t need employees or even an office – you will need to do some heavy self-promotion. Relationships and referrals are key for this type of work, Bannigan said. Business cards and a user-friendly website showing an online portfolio are a mus,t as well as a printed portfolio. Networking through industry websites is also essential, she said.

Before you embark on this career, you should understand fashion shows, have the ability to work with the creative-minded people and be flexible enough to deal with diverse personalities, Bannigan said. Income potential is based on the number of clients you have and how big they are.

This business is ideal for someone with a corporate background who wants to make a move into fashion. A fashion business coach helps guide design firms in all aspects of running their business – from growth plans to everyday tasks such as invoice collection and bookkeeping . It also can involve coaching the creative designer on how to perform and interact in different business settings, Bannigan said.

Startup costs for a fashion coaching business are minimal, but earning potential is significant.

“Research consultancy services with established businesses can make six-figure salaries with constant clientele,” Bannigan said.

It might be hard to believe, but influential websites such as the Sartorialist and Racked debuted as small fashion blogs. They’ve since come into their own as industry thought leaders, and they sell lots of advertising.

Not too much investment is needed in a fashion blog – website development and hosting can be quite inexpensive – but it will require lots of legwork. Whether you’re stalking the city streets in search of fashionable photo ops or following the moves of leading designers, you’ll need to be tracking changing trends at every moment.

On the plus side, a fashion blog can be a complement to your existing job, said Angie Wojak, director of career services at the School of Visual Arts.

“You can start a blog on your own while looking for job, and it doesn’t take a big outlay of cash,” Wojak said.

Photo stylists work with photographers to scout shoot locations, get clothing to shoots, buy furniture and accessories and generally make sure the photo shoot goes as planned. It requires a good sense of fashion, an understanding of fashion history, and the smarts to know where to source your products, according to Sara Petitt, coordinator of the fabric styling program at the Fashion Institute of Technology, in New York.

Successful photo stylists can come from any background. They usually make their mark by doing a good job and gaining business through word of mouth. Photo stylists can be paid hourly or by the project.

Do you love to talk your favorite designer brands up to friends and family? Are you always searching for the latest fashion news and sample sales? If so, you might consider starting your own fashion public relations business. Fashion PR is a difficult field to break into, but with the right skill set and connections, you can help designers and other fashion businesses get noticed by the media and fashionistas.

In an article on PR Couture, entrepreneur Jonathan Leger writes that there are several key components to success as a fashion PR professional. You must first be able to create a strong brand for your clients to differentiate them from other designers. You must also know how to work with fashion editors to get magazine placements, and with models and celebrities to get your clients’ work in the public eye. You should also have a keen understanding of media trends and be able to prove the value of your work.